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Wednesday, October 18, 2017

CLSA/LSA submission deadline extended

The deadline to submit proposals to the CLSA/LSA meeting in Toronto next June has been extended from October 18th to October 23rd. You can submit your proposals here: http://www.lawandsociety.org/Toronto2018/2018-submit-menu.html.

Monday, October 16, 2017

CFP: Comparative perspectives on regulating age of consent and child-marriage in the British Empire, 1880 to 1930

via Legal History Blog:

Comparative perspectives on regulating age of consent and child-marriage in the British Empire, 1880 to 1930.  June 15, 2018.  SOAS University of London.

This is a call for proposals for a one-day interdisciplinary conference which aims to explore the debates that led to the reform of age of consent laws around the British Empire during the years 1880 to 1930. The conference is particularly interested in exploring the issues of age of consent and child marriage through interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives in law and history.

Intertwined within these debates are notions of gender, women's rights, biology, and attempts to understand the native psyche. These compete with tropes of cultural relativism, orientalism, the female victim, and the white man's burden amongst other concerns. For the purpose of this conference, consent is interpreted widely to include physical and intellectual consent to sexual activities as well as marriage.  The conference aims to bring together the growing number of scholars who are currently working on the histories of age of consent in the British Empire.

Recognising that the development and history of the age of consent debate is transnational, international, and multi-layered one, the conference is conceived of as a starting point for forming an international network of scholars working in the area. 

Themes of the conference include but are not limited to notions of consent-physical and/or intellectual; age of consent campaigns and national movements; religion/class/region based perspectives on consent; comparative or regional studies on age of consent/marriage; age of consent for males; consent, female body, and nationalism/imperialism.

Please send 300-word abstract with a short bio to ageofconsentsoas@gmail.com. The deadline is 08 January 2018.  Bursaries might be available for PG students.  Organisers: Dr Kanika Sharma (SOAS) and Dr Laura Lammasniemi (Anglia Ruskin University).

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

CFP: Legal History and Empires: Perspectives from the Colonized

Call for Papers

LEGAL HISTORY AND EMPIRES: PERSPECTIVES FROM THE COLONIZED

The University of the West Indies, July 11-13, 2018

The conference ‘Legal History and Empires: Perspectives from the Colonised’ will be held at The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, in Barbados from July 11 to 13, 2018. The conference is jointly sponsored by the Faculty of Law and Faculty of Humanities and Education of The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, and an international group of legal historians and historians of the law.

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Maya Jasanoff, Coolidge Professor of History, Harvard University

This conference follows the successful conference on the Legal Histories of the British Empire held at the National University of Singapore in 2012, and is similarly designed to bring together senior and emerging scholars working in the fields of imperial and colonial legal history.

We invite paper or panel proposals addressing legal histories of empires broadly, and encourage participants to think in particular how their research connects with the theme of the conference: perspectives from the colonized.

Without in any way limiting the range of proposals topics and themes might include: relations between Empires; histories from the peripheries of empire; mobilities, networks and transplants; law and gender; Indigenous histories and the law; slavery and indentured labour; regulation of labour; histories of immigration law; administration of justice and rule of law; histories of public or private law; colonial law and local circumstances; settler colonialism; crime; the professions.

Individual paper proposals should be maximum 300 words (and include a bio of no more than 100 words); panel proposals should consist of an overall panel theme (300 words), the titles of individual papers and short bios (no more than 100 words) of each presenter. Panels may include commentators.

Proposals should be sent to Prof Shaunnagh Dorsett, University of Technology Sydney (Shaunnagh.Dorsett@uts.edu.au) by 15 JANUARY 2018.

General inquiries about the Conference should be addressed to Dr. Asya Ostroukh, UWI, Cave Hill (asya.ostroukh@cavehill.uwi.edu)


Conference website: http://www.cavehill.uwi.edu/Law/legal-history/home.aspx (Information, including accommodation options and additional optional activities on July 10 and 14 will be available soon.)

Friday, September 22, 2017

Pilarczyk, Acts of the 'Most Sanguinary Rage': Spousal Murder in Montreal, 1825-1850 in AJLH


Ian Pilarczyk of Boston University has published Acts of the “Most Sanguinary Rage”: Spousal Murder in Montreal, 1825-1850 in the September issue of the American Journal of Legal History.


Here's the abstract:

his study examines the 11 cases of wife murder (uxoricide) and 3 cases of husband murder (mariticide) identified in the judicial district of Montreal between 1825-1850, a period of considerable social flux.Through examination of judicial archives and primary sources, supplemented by comprehensive review of period newspapers, these cases allow us to examine the dynamics and causes that motivated spousal murders and offer insight into the motivations, means, and mechanics of investigation and prosecution of these crimes as well as the role of mercy and executive clemency. In so doing, it contributes to our understanding of family violence and the administration of criminal justice for an under-examined period in Canadian history. These gendered crimes reflect “traditional” male attempts to exert and maintain power dynamics and privilege through the use of ongoing violence, rather than the influence of romantic ideals and sexual jealousy reflected in other jurisdictions of the period, and rarely involved premeditated murder. Wives, in contrast, had motives that were altogether murkier, but their actions suggested they acted opportunistically to achieve their desired ends. Whatever the reasons that motivated them, these cases were set against a deeply-gendered backdrop of juridical processes and media coverage that reinforced traditional notions of gender and social mores, and in which the identity of female offenders and victims receded almost to the point of invisibility.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Law and Society Association and Canadian Law and Society Association to meet in Toronto, June 2018

I am really looking forward to this. Let's try for a strong Canadian legal history contingent, both presenting and attending!

2018 joint meeting of the Law and Society Association
and the Canadian Law and Society Association/ Association Canadienne Droit et Société


June 7 - 10, 2018

Sheraton Centre, Toronto, Canada

lsaclsa

LAW AT THE CROSSROADS: LE DROIT A LA CROISÉE DES CHEMINS

For thousands of years the place where the City of Toronto is located has been a crossroad where many peoples have met and had fruitful exchanges. According to some Indigenous knowledge keepers, the word “Toronto” comes from the Wendat term for a fishing weir constructed of sticks standing in the water. Lake and river fishing has been an important activity for the area’s many Indigenous peoples, including Huron-Wendat, Haudenosaunee, Mississauga and Chippewa. The Indigenous knowledge frameworks and laws of the peoples of this area encourage a multilayered understanding of an item such as a fishing weir in terms of its natural, sacred, practical and social meanings.
The area continues to be home to many Indigenous people from all over Canada and beyond, but Toronto has also been shaped by immigration flows from many parts of the world, with about half of its current residents being born outside of Canada.
The Law and Society Association and the Canadian Law and Society Association hope that our joint meeting in Toronto will be creative and fruitful, in keeping with the traditional use of this land as a gathering place, and that visitors to the area will take the opportunity to make new connections not only with one another but also with diverse local communities.

Call for papers and panels here.

Stanger-Ross, Blomley "‘My land is worth a million dollars’: How Japanese Canadians contested their dispossession in the 1940s" in LHR

New in the Law and History Review, Jordan Stanger-Ross and Nicholas Blomley and the Landscapes of Injustice Collective of the University of Victoria have an article: Stanger-Ross, Blomley "‘My land is worth a million dollars’: How Japanese Canadians contested their dispossession in the 1940s."

Here's the abstract:

On July 31, 1944, Rikizo Yoneyama, a former resident of Haney, British Columbia, an agricultural area east of Vancouver, wrote to the Canadian Minister of Justice to protest the sale of his property. Two years earlier, when he and his family had packed their belongings for their forced expulsion from coastal British Columbia, they could take with them only what they could carry and, like other displaced people, they left much behind. “I realize that we are the victims of a war emergency and as such are quite willing to undergo … hardship … to help safeguard the shores of our homeland,” wrote Yoneyama, “however, I do urgently desire to return to my home … when the present emergency ends. May I plead your assistance in the sincere request for the return of that home?” When letters like his did receive a response from the federal government (there is no record that he did so in this case) it came in the form of standard letter, acknowledging that “the disposal of … property will be a matter of personal concern” but informing Japanese Canadians that, in conformity with a new federal law, everything, including their homes, would be sold.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Travel grant for research on environmental groups at Laurier archives

via H-Canada:

Applications are currently being accepted for the Joan Mitchell Travel Grant at the Laurier Archives, Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario.  The travel grant will support a graduate student or established scholar who wishes to travel to the Laurier Archives to conduct research.  For more information on the grant, please visit: https://library.wlu.ca/research-materials/archives#tab-travel-award.  The application deadline is: December 2, 2016.
The Laurier Archives collects in three main areas: The history of the Lutheran Church in Canada; the environmental conservation movement in Canada; and Canadian music....

In our environment conservation collection, records of the Canadian Arctic Resources Committee document many of the major environmental issues facing Canada's north.  It contains series documenting pipelines, (including the McKenzie Valley Pipeline; the Alaska Highway Pipeline; the Foothills Pipeline); hydro-electric projects in the Hudson Bay area; interviews with Indigenous leaders about the effects of large scale dams; marine conservation, national parks; Northern communities and Indigenous peoples.  The Ken Hewitt fonds document hydrological research in the Himalayas.  Also check out the records of the Canadian Water Resources Association; the Canadian Environmental Law Association; the Canadian Biosphere Reserve Association; and geographer George Francis.

For more information, please contact the Laurier Archives.